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How to Remove an Electronic Control Board from a Built-In Wall Oven

All is well in the kitchen with a working oven.  When the oven starts showing error codes, or even goes completely dead, then it can be a struggle to put a decent meal on the table.

If you've run into these symptoms, then you may have done some troubleshooting and determined that the electronic control board (aka electronic range control - ERC) needs to be replaced or repaired.  That sounds simple enough provided you can get the board out of the oven.  Otherwise, you might have to call an appliance technician to come remove it for you.

In this article, we provide an illustrated example of a 5-10 minute operation for extracting the board so you don't have to pay the $40-$100 service fee for a tech to do the same thing.

This post specifically shows a common G.E. wall oven/microwave combo unit, but a wide variety of brand name appliances (Whirlpool, KitchenAid, Kenmore, JennAir, etc...) are configured very similarly.

1. Turn off power to the appliance

You're going to expose wiring connections that supply up to 240VAC - lethal! Turn off the breaker for the oven to avoid any tragedy.

 

 

2. Open the door and remove the mounting screws

Open the door and look at the inner trim on both sides. Typically, there are two screws on each side that are holding the oven in place against its cutout in the wall. These wood screws can be tight - you may want a power drill to remove them. Be sure not to strip the screw heads.

 

 

3. Slide the unit out from the wall

Grab onto the oven chassis and wiggle it out from the wall. You only need to move it out a few inches, until you can see screw heads on the outer trim.

 

       

4. Remove the side trim and panel screws

Take the outer trim off by removing the screws. There may also be some screws running along the bottom of the control panel - remove these as well.

5. Drop down the control panel

Now, you should be able to loosen the control panel from the oven and swivel it down. Be careful not to let it completely succumb to gravity so it doesn't yank on the wiring or drop down to the floor.

6. Document the wiring connections

Once the control panel is down, you'll see the control board mounted on the backside of the panel. There will be a lot of wiring connections to the board. We strongly recommend you document how everything is connected so you can be sure to install the board correctly after repair. Some good methods include:

  • Take pictures of the wiring
  • Flag each wire with a piece of tape and its own number/letter
  • Sketch out a diagram of where each wire goes

7. Disconnect the wiring and remove the control board from the panel

Pull the wires off their terminals on the board. Sometimes the wiring connectors can be pretty tight. Consider using needle-nose pliers to grab a hold of the spade terminal on the end of wire. Or, you can use a small flathead screwdriver to pry the wires away from the board.

*** The thin "tape-like" ribbon cable is delicate!  If this gets damaged, you will have to replace the control panel/keypad.  Gently squeeze the tabs on the connector where the ribbon cable is inserted and lift the cable away from the board.  Avoid creasing the cable.

8. Package and ship the board in for repair

These control boards tend to have fragile glass displays which cannot be replaced anymore.  Make sure to supply ample cushioning around the control board when packaging it in a box for shipping.  Use bubble wrap, styrofoam, newspaper, etc.

Then head to ApplianceBoardRepair.com and find your model/part number to get a shipping label!

9. Leave power to the unit off until the board is returned

Now that there are a bunch of loose wires dangling in the appliance control cabinet, it would be wise to leave the power off until they can be safely secured back on the control board.  If you really need to turn that breaker back on, wrap each loose wire end with plenty of electrical tape to make sure no high voltage terminals short to each other or the oven chassis.

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